The Revolving Roster: The Latest News in Artist Moves

Coming back to the art world after summer vacation can be disorienting, especially when so many artists have swapped their old galleries for new ones in recent months. Here’s a guide to the ever-revolving door of artist representation to keep you up to speed when you’re gallery hopping this fall.

Sadie Coles HQ in London has snapped up the young artist and “conceptual entrepreneur” Martine Syms, who will open her first show at the gallery next fall. Bridget Donahue will continue to represent the artist in New York.

—The Iranian-born painter and animation artist Tala Madani has defected from New York’s Jane Lombard Gallery for Lisa Spellman’s 303 Gallery. She will continue working with dealers Pilar Corrias in London and David Kordansky in Los Angeles.

—Ian Cheng, who has a show up through September 24 at MoMA PS1, joins the New York and Brussels-based Gladstone Gallery. He will maintain his representation with Pilar Corrias in London and Standard (Oslo) in Norway.

—Turner Prize-winning artist Laure Prouvost, whose lush sound and video installations are the subject of a show opening next month at the Walker Art Center in Minneapolis, has signed up with the New York and Paris-based Lisson Gallery. She will still work with Galerie Nathalie Obadia in Paris.

Max Hetzler will begin showing the conceptual installation artist Loris Greaud in his native France, with the artist’s first show planned for February 2018. Pace Gallery will continue representing the artist in New York.

—German painter Bendix Harms has joined the Los Angeles gallery Moran Bandaroff. He also works with Anton Kern Gallery in New York, where he had a show of color pencil drawings this past spring.

Lisa Brice has joined Stephen Friedman in London, where she showed a series of all-blue figurative gouaches this past spring. Salon 94 shows Brice’s work in New York and Goodman Gallery, in Johannesburg and Cape Town, shows her in her native South Africa.

—Stephen Friedman has also started representing the knitting artist Channing Hansen, who continues to show at CRG Gallery in New York and Marc Selwyn Fine Art in Beverly Hills.

Van Doren Waxter in New York has picked up experimental Brooklyn photographer Mariah Robertson. She still shows in Los Angeles with M+B.

—The Turner Prize-nominated painter George Shaw has joined Mauruani Mercier Gallery in Brussels. His first show at the gallery, “The Lost of England,” is up now through October 3.

—The Beijing-based painter of epic proportions Jia Aili joins Gagosian Gallery, while continuing to work with Klein Sun Gallery, also in New York.

—The figurative painter Mequitta Ahuja, who has a solo show currently up at the Sonja Haynes Stone Center for Black Culture and History, is now being represented by Brand New Gallery, based in Milan.

—Painter Trudy Benson now shows with New York’s Lyles and King, where she had a two-person show this summer with Yann Gerstberger. She also shows in the city with Ceysson & Bénétière.

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Fresh From the Whitney Biennial, Painter Celeste Dupuy-Spencer’s New Show Reveals a Tumultuous and Divided America

Fresh From the Whitney Biennial, Painter Celeste Dupuy-Spencer’s New Show Reveals a Tumultuous and Divided America

In Celeste Dupuy-Spencer’s first solo show in New York, “Wild and Blue,” don’t expect a respite from polarizing conversations around class, gender, and race. The paintings, now on view at Marlborough Contemporary, are densely populated tableaux that are painstakingly detailed, attributing personalities to a host of characters: demons, cops, cats, lovers, friends, and foes. But just as much as she shows a commitment to specificity, her paintings often edge toward the symbolic.

The show features canvases so timely it is a wonder the paint has dried. In Durham, August 14, 2017, a toppled statue of a Confederate soldier, crumpled on its plinth, exactly mirrors a photograph taken in North Carolina when protesters pulled down a monument just days after the deadly “Unite the Right” rally in Charlottesville, Virginia.

Much of Dupuy-Spencer’s new work is inspired by time spent with family and friends in New Orleans and upstate New York. The locales provided her with the subject matter with which to imagine or re-imagine their particular geographies. For example, the painting Cajun Navy (2017) shows a handful of people in a small boat, drifting down a flooded road, passing sunken cars and fallen trees. Images like this, ubiquitous after Hurricane Katrina devastated the Big Easy in 2005, now circulate again in the wake of record-breaking storms in Houston, Florida, and the Caribbean.

Dupuy-Spencer is one of a cohort of contemporary painters mining the headlines. She deals compellingly with subjects of collective trauma and identity politics.

See more examples of Dupuy-Spencer’s weighty paintings below:

Celeste Dupuy-Spencer, Durham, August 14, 2017 (2017). Courtesy of the artist and Marlborough Contemporary.

Celeste Dupuy-Spencer, <i>To Be Titled</i> (2017). Courtesy of the artist and Marlborough Contemporary New York.

Celeste Dupuy-Spencer, To Be Titled (2017). Courtesy of the artist and Marlborough Contemporary New York.

Celeste Dupuy-Spencer, <i>Ponchartrain</i> (2016). Courtesy of the artist and Marlborough Contemporary New York.

Celeste Dupuy-Spencer, Ponchartrain (2016). Courtesy of the artist and Marlborough Contemporary New York.

Celeste Dupuy-Spencer's George Jones Greeting the Newest Members of Heaven's Band (2017). Courtesy of the artist and Marlborough Contemporary New York.

Celeste Dupuy-Spencer’s George Jones Greeting the Newest Members of Heaven’s Band (2017). Courtesy of the artist and Marlborough Contemporary New York.

Celeste Dupuy-Spencer's The River (2017). Courtesy of the artist and Marlborough Contemporary New York.

Celeste Dupuy-Spencer’s The River (2017). Courtesy of the artist and Marlborough Contemporary New York.

Celeste Dupuy-Spencer, Ralph Di Meo (2016). Courtesy of the artist and Marlborough Contemporary New York.

Celeste Dupuy-Spencer, Ralph Di Meo (2016). Courtesy of the artist and Marlborough Contemporary New York.

Celeste Dupuy-Spencer, Love Me, Love Me, Love Me, I’m a Liberal (2017). Courtesy of the artist and Marlborough Contemporary.

Celeste Dupuy-Spencer, Love Me, Love Me, Love Me, I’m a Liberal (2017). Courtesy of the artist and Marlborough Contemporary.

Celeste Dupuy-Spencer's <i>Rokeby</i> (2017). Courtesy of the artist and Marlborough Contemporary New York.

Celeste Dupuy-Spencer’s Rokeby (2017). Courtesy of the artist and Marlborough Contemporary New York.

Celeste Dupuy-Spencer's <i>Sarah</i> (2017). Courtesy of the artist and Marlborough Contemporary NY.

Celeste Dupuy-Spencer’s Sarah (2017). Courtesy of the artist and Marlborough Contemporary NY.

Celeste Dupuy-Spencer, Cajun Navy (2017). Courtesy of the artist and Marlborough Contemporary New York.

Celeste Dupuy-Spencer, Cajun Navy (2017). Courtesy of the artist and Marlborough Contemporary New York.

 

“Celeste Dupuy-Spencer: Wild and Blue” is on view at Marlborough Contemporary, New York, Septemer 7–October 7, 2017. 

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NADA Will Return to Miami’s Ice Palace This Year After a String of Calamities

In a last-minute switcheroo, NADA Miami Beach is moving. Electrical problems at the Deauville Beach Resort, along with lingering effects from Hurricane Irma, have forced the art fair to relocate this year. Organized by the nonprofit New Art Dealers Alliance, the fair will return to Ice Palace Film Studios in downtown Miami, where it took place from 2004 to 2008. NADA Miami Beach is the marquee fair among the many satellite fairs to Art Basel Miami Beach (ABMB).

“It’s been a great home for us in the past,” executive director Heather Hubbs told artnet News.

The Deauville suffered an electrical fire in late July. The damage wasn’t fully repaired when Hurricane Irma, which struck Florida on September 11, brought high winds, heavy rain, and flooding. An operator at the Deauville said she was unable to transfer artnet News’s call to a press office because she was working on an emergency line. The hotel’s press agent did not immediately respond to a request for information on the status of repair efforts.

A dealer forwarded an email to artnet News announcing the change for the fair’s 15th edition. The text of the email, which was distributed to exhibitors on Wednesday, appears in full at the end of this article.

This edition of the fair will host some 108 galleries from 16 nations. There are 23 first-timers, including New York’s Lomex; Clearing, of New York and Brussels; Natalia Hug, Cologne; and Dan Gunn, Berlin.

The Ice Palace is located near several major stops on the Miami circuit. Via the Venetian Way Bridge, the venue is just five miles from the Miami Beach Convention Center, the home of Art Basel Miami Beach—about the same distance as the Deauville. The Palace is also just two miles from the Institute of Contemporary Art Miami—which unveils its new, purpose-built facility downtown this year—and only a mile from the Pérez Art Museum Miami. Just south of the lively Design District, it is also close to the Cisneros Collection and other private museums.

Hubbs said that the fair has actually gained 10,000 square feet of interior space, plus some 25,000 square feet of outdoor space. She and her team are working to arrange the floor plan; they anticipate that they will be able to provide each exhibitor with the agreed-upon floor space, despite some possible layout changes dictated by the venue change.

Several dealers, speaking off the record, said that the move strikes them as a major positive. They pointed out a grassy area in front of Ice Palace that provides not only a place to exhibit outdoor works, but also a social space. The industrial character and lighting of the interior provide a more neutral setting for art than the chandeliers and heavily patterned carpets of the Deauville, said the dealers. They also praised the simplified layout at the Ice Palace.

The fair has been a bit of a wanderer over the years. Its inaugural edition, in 2003, was at the Lincoln Hotel, just steps from ABMB. It was at the Ice Palace from ’04 to ’08, after which it headed to the Deauville, where it resided until 2009. The fair then moved to the more central Fontainebleau Miami Beach in 2015. It stayed there for only a year after failing to generate sufficient room rentals or restaurant revenue to be invited back, Hubbs confirmed. NADA returned to the Deauville for 2016.

As for future venues, Hubbs said it’s too soon to say. “I think the fair will be good and successful this year,” she said. “I don’t know if we would want to go back to the beach after this. I can’t really say at the moment. We just have to get through this and then see how we’re feeling.”

The text of the email distributed to participating galleries follows:

Dear Exhibitor,

NADA has just been notified by the Deauville Beach Resort that the hotel is unable to host NADA in Miami Beach this year, due to complications as a result of an electrical fire sustained in July 2017 which is now exacerbated by Hurricane Irma.

As a result of this news, NADA has partnered with the Ice Palace Studios, 1400 North Miami Avenue, to host the fifteenth edition of the fair, December 7–10, 2017. As the previous home of NADA fairs in Miami from 2004 to 2008, we are confident that the Ice Palace Studios will provide an ideal location for this year’s fair.

Located in Downtown Miami, the Ice Palace Studios is comprised of approximately 48,000 sq. ft. of interior space and 25,000 sq. ft. of garden area. The venue neighbors the Design District, and is in close vicinity to the Pérez Art Museum Miami (PAMM), ICA Miami, major collections, and the Miami Beach Convention Center. We are also in discussions with hotels nearby to secure discounted group rates for exhibitors and guests.

We value your participation in NADA, and our continued aim is to accommodate each of our exhibitors and produce a successful art fair in Miami. We are currently adapting the floor plan for the new venue. While it is possible that booth dimensions may need to be adjusted, we are working to maintain the original allotted square footage for each exhibitor.

A member of NADA’s Board of Directors or the Miami Selection Committee will be getting in touch with each exhibitor by phone today to discuss further. In the meantime, please don’t hesitate to contact us at the office with any questions.

Sincerely,

Heather Hubbs

Executive Director

New Art Dealers Alliance (NADA)

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artnet Asks: Art-World Disruptor Tim Goodman on Launching a New Digital Auction Platform Out of Australia

artnet Asks: Art-World Disruptor Tim Goodman on Launching a New Digital Auction Platform Out of Australia

In 2009, Tim Goodman was the man who stunned the art world by buying the license to the iconic Sotheby’s Australia. This was no easy feat, as it was the only time the New York-based fine art auction house had entered into a brand license agreement since it was founded in 1744. It seemed like a dream come true—the height of a 40-year career of climbing the ranks of the traditional auction industry—but in 2011, he sold to management buy-outs and took a break from the business.

Now, he’s returned with a decidedly less traditional venture: Fine Art Bourse, the latest disruptor of the fine art auction industry. In this interview, Goodman talks about his goals for equitability made possible by his new auction model, his recent run-in with Facebook censorship, and a titillating upcoming sale.

Why did you renounce your ownership of Sotheby’s Australia?
I spent 40 years in the business, watching it grow and change. I lived and breathed it, but by 2011, I was becoming increasingly disillusioned with where the industry was heading—Costs were going up faster than revenues. Something had to give. So I stepped away from it. I started to conceive a new digital alternative and in 2014, the concept of Fine Art Bourse, or FAB, was born.

Where does the traditional auction house model fall short in your opinion? Where do you see an opportunity for change?
The traditional auction house model is simply unsustainable. Every other big industry has been challenged by digital technology, and this is the only other one that remains unchallenged.

Brick-and-mortar auction houses charge outlandish fees for their services based on three cost points: real estate, human resources, and paper. So our main objective with FAB is to use the advantages of digital technology to break down the costs involved in the brick-and-mortar auction model.

Artist unknown, Reclinging Dancer. Courtesy of Fine Art Bourse.

How does FAB’s business model “break down” and manage to sustain lower costs as opposed to the major auction houses?
Our hammer falls on a Hong Kong server, so there is no indirect tax (VAT), resale royalty, or copyright fees. Our zero-waste policy means no fossil fuel-powered trucks and airplanes delivering thousands of tons of paper for catalogues. We outsource our specialists, and through this, we’re able to offer our customers the best deal on the market: 5% Buyer’s Premium and 5% Seller’s Commission, as well as free packing and shipping globally.

Your alma mater, Sotheby’s, recently announced that they were dropping their buyer’s premium to 0% for their emerging online auction plan. Do you feel threatened at all?
Clearly, Sotheby’s has finally determined that online transactions are a thing of the future in the industry. Despite their failure to realize this until now, they are to be congratulated for finally making the decision. What the duopoly won’t say publicly about their online auctions is what they are charging the seller: We understand that online auctioneers are charging their selling clients anywhere between 20% and 30% or more.

The FAB business model celebrates transparency and equability by charging the seller and the buyer 5% each. Further, FAB breaks down barriers to entry particularly by collecting from the seller and delivering to the buyer free of charge. Based on the FAB fee structure and with all the add-ons, we remain highly competitive.

Bernard Fleetwood, La Toilette. Courtesy of Fine Art Bourse.

Tell us about your inaugural sale.
We are very excited about our auction of Erotic, Fetish, and Queer Art & Objects coming up on Monday, September 25, for which we have consigned works by Warhol, Del Kathryn-Barton, and Keith Haring.

We’ve also included a collection of beautiful late 19th- to early 20th-century French cigarette cases with secret compartments hiding erotic enamel-painted scenes. I’ve found it interesting how collectors of erotic art find it so difficult to part with their treasures. In our efforts to promote this sale, we were shocked to find out that we had been gridlocked from advertising on Facebook due to their preposterous censorship policies. This raises an issue of international concern, so I wrote Mark an open letter.

It seems Facebook isn’t capable of drawing any distinctions between pornography and art.
The whole thing is absolutely ludicrous. The muse has long been nude. Among oxen and boar, it is one of her many forms. She has enchanted artists across the globe from ancient times to the present. For her immodesty and freedom, Facebook is now stoning her into submission with its ham-handed algorithms. The great patrons of culture in the past—the Medicis, and even the Catholic Church—celebrated The Birth of Venus. Now with this social media nonsense, she is being replaced by commoditized images of adolescent celebrities with band-aids over their nipples.

 

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The Tomb of an Ancient Mayan God-King Was Just Discovered in Guatemala

The Tomb of an Ancient Mayan God-King Was Just Discovered in Guatemala

Archaeologists have discovered the tomb of an ancient Mayan king at the pre-Columbian site of El Perú-Waka’ in Guatemala. Thought to date from 300–350 AD, it is the oldest royal tomb found in the northwestern Petén region.

“Although the dates are preliminary and need further analysis, we think this could be one of the first rulers of the Wak dynasty,” archaeologist Griselda Pérez Robles told artnet News in email. Along with two colleagues, Pérez Robles helped lead the tunnel excavations in the site’s palace acropolis that led to the find.

“Excavations from outside the building took 76 days of uninterrupted work,” Pérez Robles added, noting that the discovery of the tomb itself took place on day 65 and required eight intensive days of work. “We removed one of the rocks and could see a funeral chamber with bone remains. Their offerings were covered with cinnabar, which indicated that it was a personage of royalty.”

The discovery of Burial 80 at the El Perú-Waka’ Regional Archaeological Project in Guatemala. Courtesy of Proyecto Arqueológico Waka’ and the Ministry of Culture and Sports of Guatemala.

The tomb, the seventh to be found at the site, has been named Burial 80. It contained a carved jade mask that depicts the departed ruler as the Mayan god of maize, as well as 22 ceramic vessels, Spondylus shells, jade ornaments, and a shell pendant carved in the shape of a crocodile.

“The Classic Maya revered their divine rulers and treated them as living souls after death,” David Freidel told the Source at Washington University in St. Louis, where he is a professor of anthropology. “This king’s tomb helped to make the royal palace acropolis holy ground, a place of majesty, early in the history of the Wak dynasty.”

Excavation of Burial 39 at El Perú-Waka', Petén, Guatemala, Left to right: Jennifer Piehl, Michelle Rich, and Varinia Matute, Photo © Kenneth Garrett

Excavation of Burial 39 at El Perú-Waka’, Petén, Guatemala, Left to right: Jennifer Piehl, Michelle Rich, and Varinia Matute, Photo © Kenneth Garrett.

Located at the intersection of the San Pedro and San Juan rivers, El Perú-Waka’ was a key area of commercial exchange in Petén in ancient times. “The discovery of Burial 80 allows us to get closer to the knowledge of the first centuries of the site, when it was in development, although it already had an established social organization and a complex ideological system,” said Pérez.

Excavations have been ongoing at the El Perú-Waka’ Regional Archaeological Project since 2003. “The site, given its history and influence in the region, is extraordinary,” said Pérez Robles. “It would not be surprising if further findings of great relevance continue to be uncovered.”

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